Cepeda Branch

Cepeda Branch

512-974-7372
Monday - Thursday10 AM - 9 PM
FridayClosed
Saturday10 AM - 5 PM
SundayClosed

Although the Cepeda Branch opened on June 20, 1998, it has a history in East Austin that spans over 25 years. It officially got its start back in 1975 as the Rosewood-Zaragoza Branch, located within the Rosewood-Zaragoza Recreation Center on Webberville Road. Then in 1978, having outgrown its space at the Center, the Branch was moved to a shopping center on E. 7th Street and renamed Govalle. A few years later, the Govalle Branch was relocated to a leased site on E. César Chávez, where it remained for the next 10 years. Finally in 1992, after East Austin residents had campaigned for over a decade for a new branch facility in their area, a city bond issue passed which appropriated funds for building six new branches in Austin, including one for Govalle. The site on Pleasant Valley Road was soon chosen and, in the spring of 1997, ground breaking ceremonies were carried out for the new Branch. While it was initially to be named the Zaragoza Branch, in 1997 it was named the Cepeda Branch in honor of Eustasio Cepeda, a Latino community leader in the 1930s and 1940s.

Upcoming Events at the Cepeda Branch

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Thursday, October 23, 2014

3:30 PM Book Circle
4:00 PM Lego Lab

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Thursday, October 30, 2014

3:30 PM Book Circle

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Thursday, November 6, 2014

3:30 PM Book Circle

APL Recommends

Cover of the book Acts of faith
By Philip Caputo.
This epic novel, based on the author's own experiences in Africa, tells the stories of pilots, aid workers, missionaries, and renegades struggling to relieve the misery wrought by the civil war in Sudan. The hearts of these men and women are in the right place, but as they plunge into a well of moral corruption for which they are ill-prepared, their hidden flaws conspire with circumstances to turn their strengths--bravery, compassion, daring, and empathy--into weaknesses. In pursuit of noble ends, they make ethical compromises; their altruism curdles into self-righteous zealotry and greed, entangling them in a web of conspiracies that leads, finally, to murder. A few, however, escape the moral trap and find redemption in the discovery that firm convictions can blind the best-intentioned man or woman to the difference between right and wrong.--From publisher description.